Child Development

When Children and Culture Collide: An Interview with P. Donohue Shortridge

Friday, July 4th, 2014

P. Donohue Shortridge works with schools and families as a consultant, helping them implement Montessori ideals in their practice and in their lives. I thought it would be good to talk to her about the topic of children and culture, and she was kind enough to answer my questions. Let’s jump right in!

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Dealing with Dyslexia

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Dyslexia is something that I’ve heard about my entire adult life as a teacher. But my knowledge has been fairly superficial until now.

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9 Great Places to Find Educational Gifts for the Holidays

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010

This is the time of year for gift-giving, and it’s not a surprise that I like to give my children educational gifts mixed in with the toys. The great thing is there are lots of fantastic places offering educational games, activities, books, kits, and crafts for every age group. Here are some of my favorites!

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Montessori and the Child with Special Needs

Sunday, October 17th, 2010

Recently I have received quite a few questions about children with special needs (autism, ADHD, and others) and how they can fit into the Montessori environment. Since many of the questions were similar, it seemed like a good idea to jot down some thoughts about this topic.

There are several things about the Montessori philosophy and materials that make it a wonderful option for special needs children, and several things that can cause some difficulty also. Please note that I am speaking in generalities; every school is different so there’s a lot of variation out there.

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Is It Okay for Children to Think They’re Special?

Sunday, July 18th, 2010

“Oh sweetie, you’re so special.”

I found myself saying this to my 6-year-old daughter the other day and afterward, began to think about the implications of that statement.

This MSN Mental Health article warns us that the results of a 24-year-long survey of college students indicate a serious rise in a narcissistic approach to living.

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Looking Beneath the Surface

Sunday, May 16th, 2010

Recently, my children and I stopped to take a walk around a small lake. As we were walking, we found a circular abandoned garden with large hedges around it, shielding it from view. The garden had been divided into sections, but there was nothing growing.

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Taking a Look at Santa Again

Sunday, December 6th, 2009

It’s that time again – time for family, friends, festivities, and traditions. What would Christmas be without Santa? And what would Santa be without another fun Montessori discussion? Well, it’s a topic that seems to need some re-visiting.

As many of you might remember, a few years ago I addressed the burning question about whether or not parents should tell their children the truth about Santa. Maria Montessori thought that telling kids about Santa and letting them believe he really exists was wrong, and would lead to doubt later on when they found out the truth. I personally feel somewhat similar, and have not told my kids that Santa is real or that gifts come from Santa.

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Following the Child

Sunday, October 25th, 2009

Recently I’ve seen or heard a few questions about what it means to “follow the child”. It’s one of those Montessori phrases we throw around, but what does it really mean?

Since Maria Montessori divides ages into 6-year cycles, it’s helpful to do so for this topic as well. In the 0-6 age group, following the child typically means observing the child in the classroom and using their interests and level of ability as a guide.

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Sensorial Work Leads to Sensory Awareness

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009

I love the materials in the sensorial area of the Montessori classroom – they speak to the tactile learner in all of us. What impresses me most about how humans learn is how often we use more than one sense to explore.

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Are Kids Punished by Rewards?

Sunday, August 16th, 2009

I recently read the book “Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, ‘A’s, Praise, and Other Bribes” by Alfie Kohn, a noted author and outspoken critic of traditional education, including grades, test scores, and homework. Much of what he says is in agreement with the Montessori approach to education.

As I read, I thought about this question: In Montessori, we often talk about the harm of external rewards, but are we using them without realizing it?

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